Judge Gina Groh

Judge Gina Groh

SHEPHERDSTOWN – Chief U.S. District Judge Gina Groh, who this afternoon issued an injunction halting the Jefferson County school system’s plans to seize the controversial Rockwool factory site for a just-unveiled regional student support center, went to college in Jefferson County and later spent four years here as an assistant prosecutor.

She and her family live in Charles Town.

Groh, 54, grew up in Williamsport, Md., and earned her bachelor’s degree from then-Shepherd College. She went on to earn her law degree from West Virginia University.

At Shepherd, Groh won a coveted McMurran Scholar Award, the top academic honor granted by the school.

Starting in 2002, she worked in the prosecutor’s office in Charles Town.

Groh has been a federal judge since 2012, becoming chief judge three years later.

She’d been nominated her to the court vacancy created by the death of Craig Broadwater. At the time, she was serving as a judge for the 23rd Judicial Circuit Court – a position she’d held since 2006.

Earlier in her career, Groh worked for law firms, including Steptoe & Johnson in Martinsburg as well as law firms in Hagerstown, Md., Baltimore and D.C. She became an assistant prosecutor in Berkeley County in 2002.

In her questionnaire to the U.S. Senate as she was considered for the federal bench, Groh included as her civic memberships the Friends of Shepherdstown Library, the Jefferson County Historical Society and Shepherdstown’s Cress Creek Country Club.

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